The Capability Maturity Model integration (CMMI)

The Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) is a capability maturity model developed by the Software Engineering Institute. The CMMI principal is that “the quality of a system or product is highly influenced by the process used to develop and maintain it”. CMMI can be used to guide process improvement across a project, a division, or an entire organization. The CMMI provides
  • Guidelines for processes improvement
  • An integrated approach to process improvement
  • Embedding process improvements into a state of business as usual
  • A phased approach to introducing improvements

CMMI Models :

CMMI consists of three overlapping disciplines (constellations) providing specific focus into the Development, Acquisition and Service Management domains respectively:

  • CMMI for Development (CMMI-DEV) – CMMI-DEV model is collection of best practices meant for software Development and Support companies to improve their products and as a result to improve customer satisfaction. 
  • CMMI for Services (CMMI-SVC) –  CMMI-SVC model is used to improve management and service delivery processes in an organization that develops, manages, and delivers services. 
  • CMMI for Acquisition (CMMI-ACQ) – CMMI-ACQ model is used to improve supplier management processes in an organization that deals with multiple suppliers for its business.

To determine an organization’s current state of process maturity the CMMI uses two ways :

1. As a continuous model 
2. As a staged model.

In CMMI models with a staged representation, there are five maturity levels :

1. initial 
2. Managed
3. Defined
4. Quantitatively Managed
5. Optimizing

Maturity levels consist of a predefined set of process areas. The maturity levels are measured by the achievement of the specific and generic goals that apply to each predefined set of process areas. The following sections describe the characteristics of each maturity level in detail.

1. Maturity Level 1 - Initial : At maturity level 1, processes are usually ad hoc and chaotic. The organization usually does not provide a stable environment. Success in these organizations depends on the competence and heroics of the people in the organization and not on the use of proven processes. Maturity level 1 organizations often produce products and services that work; however, they frequently exceed the budget and schedule of their projects. Maturity level 1 organizations are characterized by a tendency to over commit, abandon processes in the time of crisis, and not be able to repeat their past successes.

2. Maturity Level 2 : Managed : At maturity level 2, an organization has achieved all the specific and generic goals of the maturity level 2 process areas. In other words, the projects of the organization have ensured that requirements are managed and that processes are planned, performed, measured, and controlled. The process discipline reflected by maturity level 2 helps to ensure that existing practices are retained during times of stress. When these practices are in place, projects are performed and managed according to their documented plans.

3. Maturity Level 3 - Defined : At maturity level 3, an organization has achieved all the specific and generic goals of the process areas assigned to maturity levels 2 and 3. At maturity level 3, processes are well characterized and understood, and are described in standards, procedures, tools, and methods.

4. Maturity Level 4 - Quantitatively Managed : At maturity level 4, an organization has achieved all the specific goals of the process areas assigned to maturity levels 2, 3, and 4 and the generic goals assigned to maturity levels 2 and 3. At maturity level 4 Sub-processes are selected that significantly contribute to overall process performance. These selected sub-processes are controlled using statistical and other quantitative techniques. Quantitative objectives for quality and process performance are established and used as criteria in managing processes. Quantitative objectives are based on the needs of the customer, end users, organization, and process implementers. Quality and process performance are understood in statistical terms and are managed throughout the life of the processes.

5. Maturity Level 5 - Optimizing : At maturity level 5, an organization has achieved all the specific goals of the process areas assigned to maturity levels 2, 3, 4, and 5 and the generic goals assigned to maturity levels 2 and 3. Processes are continually improved based on a quantitative understanding of the common causes of variation inherent in processes. Maturity level 5 focuses on continually improving process performance through both incremental and innovative technological improvements. Quantitative process-improvement objectives for the organization are established, continually revised to reflect changing business objectives, and used as criteria in managing process improvement.



Next Topic :

No comments:

Post a Comment